Pub Preservation Pieces – with Dave Pickersgill

ACV update

Sheffield and District CAMRA have piloted a national CAMRA scheme which encourages branches to nominate pubs in their area as Assets of Community Value (ACV). We nominated eleven pubs, ten in Sheffield and one in the Derbyshire Dales. Derbyshire Dales have approved our application to list The Red Lion (Litton) as an ACV.

RED PUBS MATTER.JPG

However, Sheffield City Council, who also received the applications in late June responded with a series of further questions. They have since stated that decisions will be made by 24th.October. The ten pubs are a mix of heritage, suburban, city centre and rural. Once Sheffield has ruled on these applications, we will review our position and may submit more pubs for ACV status.

Currently only two Sheffield pubs, the Castle (Bolsterstone) and the Plough (Crosspool) have ACV listing. In our wider ‘district,’ the Red Lion has joined the Angel (Spinkhill) and the Anglers Rest (Bamford). Once a pub is ACV listed, planning permission is required for any change of use or demolition.

The ACV listing scheme is open to all CAMRA branches. Each branch can use this assistance to nominate up to ten pubs/month. The branch provides basic details, then CAMRA nationally, complete the paperwork, check ownership, obtain ground plans and paid the fee. After checking the details and adding more information, the branch then submits the completed documentation to the appropriate Local Authority. Four workshops are planned for CAMRA branches.

These will discuss how to access CAMRA’s Support Service and will also hear from other Branches leading the way with ACV nominations. Sheffield CAMRA will be represented at the first workshop which is in Manchester on 3rd. October.

Nationally, Communities Pubs Minister Marcus Jones has presented the first ‘Badge of Honour’ to an ACV-listed pub. To date, more than 800 pubs have achieved ACV status. The first new badge – declaring ‘This Pub Matters’ – was presented to Tina Massie of The Red Lion, Knotty Green, Buckinghamshire, at the recent Great British Beer Festival which was held, in London, at Olympia. The initiative is a joint venture between the Campaign for Real Ale and the Department for Communities & Local Government.

More information is available at:

CAMRA – List your Local

CAMRA – Nominating as a CAMRA branch

Sheffield City Council – Assets of Community Value

Derbyshire Dales District Council – Community Right to Bid

Listing for post-war pubs?

Historic England seeks details of pubs that could lead to them getting listed status: Heritage body Historic England is seeking details of the nation’s pubs for a research project that could lead to more getting listed status. It particularly wants to hear about pubs built or rebuilt between 1945 and 1985 as part of a new thematic review. The project, which could last up to two years, could then recommend additions to the 11 post-war pubs that already have listed status. Historic England said: “Currently, post-war pubs are a severely threatened building type, with many being converted to other uses or demolished altogether. Through this project we are aiming to help people understand and appreciate these buildings, and hopefully to help protect them.”

The buildings nominated need not be still used as a pub and could have been closed, altered or even demolished. Historic England said the information would help ensure “the knowledge of post-war pubs across England is as complete and up-to-date as possible”. Currently just two post-war public houses are listed in their own right – the former Lord High Admiral in Pimlico, London, which is now in use as an Argentinian restaurant and Jack Straw’s Public House in Hampstead, London, which replaced an 18th century pub destroyed during the Blitz.

Another eight post-war pubs are currently listed as part of wider development schemes: The Shakespeare – part of the Barbican Estate in London; The Pimlico Tram, Westminster; the former Crowders Well – part of the Barbican estate in London; The Earl George, The Link, The Scottish Queen and The Parkway at the Park Hill estate, Sheffield; The Pride of Pimlico in Westminster and The Cock Tavern at Smithfield Market in London. Suggestions can be emailed to jo.bradley@HistoricEngland.org.uk.


Pub company Punch Taverns has announced it is to sell 158 of its pubs. The Burton headquartered firm has agreed to sell 158 outlets to New River Retail for £53.5 million. The move is part of the firm’s strategy to sell its non-core pubs at a rate of about 200 a year. Following the sale, Punch will have 2,900 “core” pubs and 550 non-core pubs. New River Retail is a specialist real estate investment trust (REIT) focussed on the UK food and value retail sector. The proceeds will be used to reduce Punch’s debt. It is feared that New River will convert many of the pubs into stores. In November 2013, Marston’s, sold 202 pubs to New River.


Proposals have been submitted to Sheffield City Council to turn The Market Inn, on Wortley Road, High Green, into a business centre, as well as building 14 houses on the surrounding land. And under separate plans developers want to convert The Ball Inn, on Myrtle Road, Heeley, into five apartments, while also putting up a four-storey building with 15 flats.

Under The Market Inn scheme, the pub building will be retained, with the interior rearranged to create several office suites. The Ball would be turned into five two-bedroom flats. The new building will be constructed to the rear of the site, offering 15 two and three-bedroom flats.

 

Heritage, News, Pubs
Andy Cullen

About Andy Cullen

Andy has been actively involved in CAMRA since the early 2000s after being recruited to sit on a National Younger Members Task Group. Since then he has held roles on the branch committee including Secretary, Membership Secretary, Magazine Editor, Chair and now Social Secretary. Andy has also been involved with the Steel City Beer & Cider Festival almost every year since becoming active in the branch.

2 comments

  1. Sheffield CAMRA ACV applications rejected

    As previously reported, Sheffield & District CAMRA piloted the national
    CAMRA scheme which encourages branches to nominate pubs in their area as
    Assets of Community Value (ACV). Once a pub is ACV listed, planning
    permission is required for any change of use or demolition.

    We nominated eleven pubs, ten in Sheffield and one in the Derbyshire
    Dales. After the statutory eight week period, Derbyshire Dales Council
    approved our application to list The Red Lion (Litton) as an ACV.

    However, Sheffield City Council, who also received the applications in
    late June , responded with a series of further questions. In late October,
    they finally made their decisions. We were told (verbally) on 28th.October
    that all our applications were rejected.

    We are very surprised by these decisions. Advice from CAMRA, nationally,
    was followed throughout the process. Our draft applications were compared
    to successful ACV applications from other parts of the country. In each
    case, it was felt that the detail we included was more than adequate to
    guarantee an ACV listing.

    Nationwide, the criteria for a successful ACV application does not seem to
    be consistent. It seems that Sheffield City Council are demanding more
    than many other bodies. By contrast, Derbyshire Dales welcomed our
    application. It almost seems that Sheffield do not wish to approve AVC
    listings – there are only 2 pubs listed, in Sheffield, as ACV.

    We will await the written formal response before deciding how to respond.

  2. Sheffield and District CAMRA – ACV applications – the story so far

    – we have not been formally told of decisions regarding the 10 ACV applications we submitted.

    June 2015
    Sheffield and District CAMRA nominate eleven pubs, ten in Sheffield and one in the Derbyshire Dales.

    July 2015 A series of questions arrives from SCC regarding the ACV applications

    August 2015 After the statutory eight week period, Derbyshire Dales Council approved our application to list The Red Lion (Litton) as an ACV

    21/08/2015 Amended ACV applications are sent to SCC – SCC impose a further 8 week wait

    16/10/2015 8 weeks later – no decisions from SCC

    28/10/2015 I am told (verbally: phone) that all our applications to SCC are rejected. This was later followed by completed assessment forms (SCC Legal Team) sent to Sheffield CAMRA via email

    30/10/2015 These decisions are retracted as the papers had not been signed by an appropriate SCC Cabinet Member:

    ‘Following our conversation yesterday, I have an update for you. Unfortunately, due to a misunderstanding between myself and Legal who are responsible for convening the assessment panel and ensuring the final decision is made by the Cabinet Member, it appears that the decisions have not yet been confirmed.

    The recommendation is to turn down all the nominations but this will still need to be confirmed by the Cabinet Member.

    I can only apologise for this misunderstanding and any inconvenience this may cause you. When the final decision has been made, you will be contacted as soon as possible.’

    13/11/2015 ACV application for the Bull’s Head (Foolow) submitted to Derbyshire Dales

    20/11/215 Email to Isobel Bowler (SCC Cabinet Member) – this is forwarded to Chief Executive

    24/11/2015 Email to Chief Executive, SCC

    Notes:
    We are very surprised by suggestions that these applications could be rejected. Advice from CAMRA, nationally, was followed throughout the process. Our draft applications were compared to successful ACV applications from other parts of the country. In each case, it was felt that the detail included was more than adequate to guarantee an ACV listing. For example, the successful application for the Red Lion (Derbyshire Dales) includes considerably less detail than many of the Sheffield applications.

    The Regulations don’t mention the word ‘local.’ They say that the community nomination must include, inter alia, “the nominator’s reasons for thinking that the responsible authority should conclude that the land is of community value”. It’s only the (non-statutory) guidance which mentions local. The guidance itself doesn’t define local and it could be argued that the whole of Sheffield is local to the pubs we nominated.

    Nationwide, the criteria for a successful ACV application is obviously not consistent. It seems that Sheffield City Council are ‘gold-plating’ – they are demanding more than many other bodies.

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